print

Nevada State Profile

The State Health Division and community-based organizations in Nevada received $851,532  in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2007. 1

  

Nevada Sexuality Education Law and Policy

Nevada mandates that each school district’s board of trustees “establish a course or unit of a course of: (a) Factual instruction concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome [AIDS]; and (b) Instruction on the human reproductive system, related communicable diseases and sexual responsibility.” Such classes cannot be a requirement for graduation. Furthermore, each board of trustees must appoint an advisory committee consisting of five parents with children in the school district and four representatives from medicine, counseling, religion, students, or teaching. Nevada law also mandates that:

The parent or guardian of each pupil to whom a course is offered must first be furnished written notice that the course will be offered. The notice must be given in the usual manner used by the local district to transmit written material to parents, and must contain a form for the signature of the parent or guardian of the pupil consenting to his attendance. Upon receipt of the written consent of the parent or guardian, the pupil may attend the course. If the written consent of the parent or guardian is not received, he must be excused from such attendance without any penalty as to credits or academic standing.

This is referred to as an “opt-in” policy.

See Nevada Revised Statutes 389.065.

Back to Top

Recent Legislation

SIECUS is not aware of any proposed legislation regarding sexuality education in Nevada.

Back to Top

Events of Note 

SIECUS is not aware of any recent events regarding sexuality education in Nevada.

Back to Top

Nevada’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note2

  1. In 2007, 40% of female high school students and 45% of male high school students in Nevada reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students nationwide.
  2. In 2007, 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in Nevada reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students nationwide.
  3. In 2007, 10% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in Nevada reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students nationwide.
  4. In 2007, 30% of female high school students and 31% of male high school students in Nevada reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students nationwide.
  5. In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 57% of females and 81% of males in Nevada reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 55% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
  6. In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 19% of females and 15% of males in Nevada reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 13% of males nationwide.
  7. In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 18% of females and 25% of males in Nevada reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 18% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
  8. In 2007, 82% of high school students in Nevada reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 90% of high school students nationwide.

Back to Top

Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding

The Nevada State Health Division received $280,174 in federal Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding in Fiscal Year 2007. The Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups. Nevada’s match is made by the media company contracted for the statewide campaign.   

Nevada uses some of its Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds for a statewide media campaign, including radio and television ads.3 Members of the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council helped create the messages. The ads “focused on parental communication and encouraged parents to talk to their children and children to talk to their parents about sex and sex related issues, emphasizing abstinence as a choice.”The ads also appeared in Spanish.

There are five sub-grantees in Nevada: Crisis Pregnancy Center, Goshen Community Development Corporation, Nevada Broadcasters Association, Southern Nevada Health Education Center, and Sunrise Children’s Foundation. 

Back to Top

Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees 

There is one CBAE grantee in Nevada: Crisis Pregnancy Center. There is one AFLA grantee in Nevada: Southern Nevada Area Health Education Center (AHEC).

According to the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, Crisis Pregnancy Center uses Worth the Wait, a popular abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum. SIECUS reviewed Worth the Wait and found that it covers some important topics related to sexuality such as puberty, anatomy, and sexual abuse, and that the curriculum is based on reliable sources of data. Despite these strengths, Worth the Wait relies on messages of fear, discourages contraceptive use, and promotes biased views of gender, marriage, and pregnancy options. For example, the curriculum explains, “teenage sexual activity can create a multitude of medical, legal, and economic problems not only for the individuals having sex but for society as a whole.”4

Crisis Pregnancy Center also used its funding to bring abstinence-only-until-marriage speaker Pam Stenzel to middle schools and high schools.5 Pam Stenzel is a well-known abstinence-only-until-marriage speaker. SIECUS reviewed her video “Sex Still Has a Price Tag,” in which Stenzel delivers two 40-plus-minute monologues to a studio audience of high school students. She uses a preacher’s cadence and often yells at her audience in attempts to emphasize her points. Stenzel focuses on unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and other negative outcomes of sex such as emotional pain and the inability to bond.Her presentation relies on fear, promotes shame, and mandates decisions for young people.For example, Stenzel tells her audience ““If you forget everything else I told you today, and you can only remember one thing, this is what I want you to hear. If you have sex outside of one permanent monogamous—and monogamy does not mean one at a time—that means one partner who has only been with you—if you have sex outside of that context, you will pay.”6

Back to Top

Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2007

Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee Length of Grant Amount of Grant Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)

Nevada State Health Division

health2k.state.nv.us 

$280,174  federal
$210,131 state

Title V

Area Health Education Center of Southern Nevada
www.snahec.org

$23,000

Title V sub-grantee

Crisis Pregnancy Center
DUAL GRANTEE
2005–2008
www.renocrisispregnancycenter.com

$46,000
$371,358

Title V sub-grantee
CBAE

Goshen Community Development Coalition
www.goshenonline.org

$23,000

Title V sub-grantee

Southern Nevada Area Health Education Center (AHEC)
DUAL GRANTEE
2003–2008
www.snahec.org

$18,185

$200,000

Title V sub-grantee

AFLA

Sunrise Children’s Foundation
www.sunrisechildren.org

$46,000

Title V sub-grantee

Back to Top

Adolescent Health Contact7
Kyle Devine
Child and Adolescent Health Coordinator
Bureau of Family Health Services
Nevada State Health Division
3427 Goni Rd., Suite 108
Carson City, NV 89706
Phone: (775) 684-4256

Back to Top

Nevada Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Aid for AIDS of Nevada
2300 South Rancho Dr., Suite 211
Las Vegas, NV 89102
Phone: (702) 382-2326
www.afanlv.org

GLSEN of Southern Nevada
P.O. Box 61351
Las Vegas, NV 89160
Phone: (702) 731-3811

Nevada Public Health Foundation
3579 Hwy. 50 E, Suite C
Carson City, NV 89701
Phone: (775) 884-0392
www.nphf.org

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains
950 Broadway
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: (303) 321-PLAN
www.plannedparenthood.org/rocky-mountains

Back to Top

Nevada Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Nevada Policy Research Institute
1700 East Desert Inn Rd., Suite 405A
Las Vegas, NV 89109
Phone: (702) 222-0642
www.npri.org
 

Back to Top

Newspapers in Nevada8

Las Vegas City Life
Newsroom
1385 Pama Lane, Ste. 111
Las Vegas, NV 89119
Phone: (702) 871-6780
www.lasvegascitylife.com

Las Vegas Review-Journal
Newsroom
P.O. Box 70
Las Vegas, NV 89125
Phone: (702) 383-0211
www.lvrj.com

Las Vegas Sun
Newsroom
P.O. Box 98970
Las Vegas, NV 89193-8907
Phone: (702) 385-3111
www.lasvegassun.com

Las Vegas Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 14446
Las Vegas, NV 89114
Phone: (702) 366-9310
www.lasvegastribune.com

Reno Gazette-Journal
Newsroom
P.O. Box 22000
Reno, NV 89520
Phone: (775) 788-6200
www.rgj.com

 

Back to Top

References

  1. This refers to the fiscal year for the Federal Government which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2007 begins on October 1, 2006 and ends on September 30, 2007.  
  2. Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2007,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57.SS-4 (6 June 2008), accessed 4 June 2008, http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>.
  3. Personal communication between Kyle Devine and Catherine Morrison, 7 April 2008.
  4. P. Sulak, Worth the Wait (Temple, TX: Scott & White Memorial Hospital, 2003). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of Worth the Wait at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
  5. J. Shipley, “Let’s talk about (the cost of) sex,” Nevada Appeal, 13 February 2007, accessed 14 March 2008, <http://www.nevadaappeal.com/article/20070213/NEWS/102130100>.
  6. P. Stenzel, “Sex Still Has a Price Tag.” (Littleton, CO: Enlighten Communications, Inc., 2006). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of “Sex Still Has a Price Tag,’ at  <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
  7. SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs.
  8. This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.This list is by no means inclusive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues.For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

Back to Top